Overturn Chris Grayling's 2013 probation reforms & other ideas

Posted on 12-01-19 by Nelson Gardnier Number of votes: 0 | Number of comments: 2

[Part A]

 

From 2010 onwards the Justice system has become dysfunctional & financially unsustainable. However what is most unjustifiable morally & politically has been the 2013 probation reforms of the then ex-Justice Minister Chris Grayling. The consequences of his probation reforms has increased the number of violent criminals being given early probation (to reduce prison numbers and thereby the costs of running UK prisons?) with it has led to an increase in violent crime rate in England & Wales.

 

As the link below shows the increase in the numbers of violent crimes being committed by criminals given probation, due to the 2013 probation reforms by Chris Grayling, has had a horrific effect on society with families devasted and individuals lives ruined because of a penny-pinching Tory Minister.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/jan/12/chris-grayling-probation-reforms-serious-crimes-committed-on-parole-soar

 

Excerpt from the above link: "The number of rapes, murders and other serious crimes committed by offenders on parole has risen by more than 50% since reforms to probation were introduced four years ago, according to official data that has triggered calls for the government to rethink its plans for another shake-up of the service."

 

To address this issue I propose the following:

 

1) Investigate why (e.g. it's structural reasons along with the deficiencies of the UK's rehabilitation programme) the Tory 2013 probation reforms have horrifically failed.

 

2) Investigate whether the increasing 'financialisation' (e.g. old & new private/public initiatives like PFI) & use of 'outsourcing' companies (e.g. G4S, Serco etc) have contributed to the failure of the 2013 probation services.

 

3) Overturn Chris Grayling 2013 probation reforms at the earliest possible occasion.

 

4) Investigate whether the other reforms of Chris Grayling (e.g. to legal aid, to court system, youth justice, new rules or amendment to procedures that deal with monitoring foreign national criminals/gangsters, ability to monitor domestic extremism like Islamist & the far-right) need to be reversed too.

 

5) Investigate whether the reforms (e.g. procedures connected to international law & rules connected to prevent the miscarriage of justice) introduced to the Ministry of Justice by Chris Grayling in any way contributed to the 'Windrush Scandal' or has undermined (e.g. early release of criminals) the protection of vulnerable people (e.g. children, disabled, OAPs) in the UK.

 

6) Investigate whether Tory reforms to Ministry of Justice has affected the prosecution of fraud & other financial crimes (e.g. unneccessary early settlements with fraudulent CEOs).

 

7) Have Labour's current Cabinet Minister for Justice use the findings of the above mentioned recommendations (i.e. policies 1-to-6) to use 'Freedom Of Information Act' & their parliamentary privileges to force the  disclosure of all documents related to the reforms introduced by the Tories to the Ministry of Justice in order to investigate if those reforms have contributed to collapse of services (e.g. court system, ability to implement/adhere to international law, ability to monitor foreign national criminals/gangsters, ability to monitor foreign & domestic extremism, ability to prevent miscarriages of justice - like Windrush - & ability to empirically evaluate the efficacy of current drugs laws) that ensures justice for the public.

 

8) Make up for the increase in the prison population due to more violent criminal offenders being retained in prison by drastically reducing prison sentences for non-violent & non-sexual offences (e.g. consumption of cannabis).

 

9) Move the responsibility of the National Archives away from the Ministry of Justice to parliament or make the National Archive an independent chartered body (e.g. like the BBC).

 

[See Part B]

Referring to: Justice and Home Affairs

The Justice and Home Affairs Policy Commission examines Labour thinking on issues such as policing, the justice system, immigration and asylum, and political and constitutional reform.

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